Disney’s 3D Plans For Lion King And More

June 23, 2010 by  
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lionking210x300The producer of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, Don Hahn, has revealed to Empire that there are plans in motion to bring back the Lion King in 3D.

Hahn said that, “I’m actually trying to work out a 3D conversion of The Lion King. I’ll be doing that when I go back to the States in a couple of weeks.”

And then everyone in the OTB office wet themselves.

“It’s going to be spectacular – we will do a good job for ya! The technology is tremendous. We did A Nightmare Before Christmas a few years ago and Tim thought it was better than the original because it allows you to walk onto the set.”

If that weren’t enough, Hahn also confirmed that Beauty and the Beast will also return in glorious 3D and there’s a definite sequel toWho Framed Roger Rabbit? which was released under the Touchstone banner. “Yeah, I couldn’t possibly comment. I deny completely, but yeah… if you’re a fan, pretty soon you’re going to be very, very, very happy.”

So that’s a yes then. There’s also an excellent chance that it’ll be in 3D too but I’m sure he couldn’t possibly comment on that. But are these plans for good or ill? Would Roger be amazingly wacky in 3D or will it make us want to jump into a vat of toon dip?

Hahn couldn’t really dish the dirt on the project that OTB are most interested right now – the live action version of Maleficent. “That’s another one I can’t talk about! All I can say is that it’s in active development and will be pretty fun.”

He wouldn’t say if the director is or isn’t Tim Burton as many hope it will be but Hahn did comment on Burton’s current baby, a remake of his original short Frankenweenie. “It is great working again with Tim on Frankenweenie, though: I love that he’s back to doing puppets. But Maleficent is a way off and it’s a little too early to talk about it, except to say that it’s happening.”

The film be going back to Burton’s roots using stop-motion puppetry which made him a household name after his success with A Nightmare Before Christmas. Even though Henry Selick was actually the director, Burton got all the credit. Poor Henry Selick.

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